PlantMyPhone – Recycle Your Old Phone and Plant A Tree

PlantMyPhone – Click here to sign the pledge and receive and for more info!

Unfortunately at this time this offer is only for people in the United States.

Trees are planted currently in 12 countries:

Belize, Burundi, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Haiti, Honduras, India, Nicaragua, Panama, Philippines, Senegal, and Zambia.

Link to the Press Kit

Photos from Planting Projects

How It Works

Step 1:

Send in your phone, free postage.  You can print out a label or request a free mailer bag

Step 2:

PlantMyPhone responsibly recycles your phone and sells the recycled materials to fund tree planting.  Trees per Phone!!

Step 3:

PlantMyPhone emails you about how many trees you planted!!

The following was copied from their website:

We all know that recycling is good for the planet, but why? Recycling your old cell phone enables you to make a difference in the well being of the planet because it limits resource consumption and keeps toxic chemicals out of our home environments.

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that each year 140 million cell phones are retired, and the rate of cell phone turnover is increasing. Additionally, it is suggested that there are currently 500 million retired cell phones that have already been discarded but not recycled. This stockpile of old cell phones could be put to good use if they are recycled. PlantMyPhone partners with recycling services that are ISO14001 certified and follow policies that ensure that materials are not exported to other countries or sent to landfills. This means that the materials in the phones are properly disposed of in the United States, in ways consistent with strict environmental guidelines. None of the materials are sent to landfills in the United States or abroad.

When a cell phone is recycled, the phone is taken apart and the pieces of the phone that are still useable are used to reconstruct phones to be sold in other markets. The remaining pieces, as well as cell phones that do not contain parts that can be reused are used instead for raw materials recovery. For every 1 million cell phones recycled, 75 pounds of gold, 772 pounds of silver, 33 pounds of palladium and 35,274 pounds of copper can be reclaimed. Both of these recycling processes are beneficial to the Earth because they reduce the mining of precious metals and cut down on the energy and resources used in production of new cell phone parts.

Why Trees?

“The symbolism – and the substantive significance – of planting a tree has universal power in every culture and every society on Earth, and it is a way for individual men, women and children to participate in creating solutions for the environmental crisis.”

Al Gore, Earth in the Balance

Advertisements

Town Hall | CAMM Worldwide

Town Hall | CAMM Worldwide.

On November 17 at 12pm ET, join host former Vice President Al Gore, inventor Dean Kamen, astronaut Sally Ride and young people from around the world for an interactive discussion exploring youth attitudes toward math and science education.

In order to participate, bookmark the above link and return on November 17th at 12 PM ET.  You can sign in using a Vokle, Facebook, or Twitter account.  You can submit questions and chat with other viewers.

There are so many countries that are ahead of us in math, science, technology, and engineering.  The U.S. is ranked 35th in Math and 29th in Science.

80% of all jobs created in the future will require math and science.  Here is a link to a video with children from other countries vs. children from the U.S. talking about what they do in school or during their day!!

Pledge to connect the young people in your life to after-school opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Panelists:

Former Vice-President Al Gore

Dean Kamen – founder of DEKA Research and Development Corporation and FIRST, which is an organization dedicated to motivationg the next generation to understand and use science and technology.

Sally Ride – American physicist and former NASA astronaut.

Topics:

1. Why is it that other countries celebrate math and science while we often portray them as uncool?

2. Do you think math and science skills are important to your child’s future?  Would your child agree?

3. How can we change attitudes about science and math so that kids today are inspired to take on these subjects?

From the CAMM website- ABOUT CAMM

“To better understand how attitudes and beliefs among young Americans contribute to our poor rankings, we traveled to three countries that rank significantly higher in math and science literacy – Finland, China and Australia – and interviewed young people, parents and teachers about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and related issues. We compared what we heard from these nations to responses from interviews conducted here in the U.S.”

Here is what they heard:

  • Youth from outside the U.S. take it as a given that if they want to be successful in life, they have to do well in math and science. We did not hear this from the U.S kids.
  • Youth from outside the U.S. are more aware that they will compete in a global marketplace and not just against kids in their own country
  • Outside the U.S., there is much less of a social stigma attached to being smart and doing well in school. In fact, the smart kids are considered cool.

THE CONNECTORY –

Search for activities and resources in your community

Whoops Again Dubya

Bush Victorious

Image by Usonian via Flickr

For Associated Press release click here

I am watching the 2008 made-for-tv movie called Recount, which has an all-star cast. I rented it thinking it was a documentary. This is not a film review but I enjoyed it! Anyways. I was surprised to find (and researched it because you can’t always trust Hollywood to get it right) that one of the sticking points about whether to do a hand recount was the interpretation of “error in tabulation” under Florida state voting laws. In the movie, each side claims different interpretations of this vague phrase. The character Dennis Leary plays, Michael Whouley, finds a law passed in 1997 in Texas pertaining to voting laws, that prefers a hand-count to a machine count in the case of an error. I was intrigued…and so I researched.

Of course, it is difficult to find if you are searching the most obvious channels online. I had to try quite a few different variations on words and phrases. But, here it is!

House Bill 331
I found it amended under section 65(d). section 65(c) is the version removed to be replaced by section 65(d) into Section 212.005, Election Code:

41-13 (d) If different counting methods are chosen under Section

41-14 214.042(a) among multiple requests for a recount of electronic

41-15 voting system results, only one method may be used in the recount.

41-16 A manual recount shall be conducted in preference to an electronic

41-17 recount and an electronic recount using a corrected program shall

41-18 be conducted in preference to an electronic recount using the same

41-19 program as the original count.

I found this interesting because I didn’t know this. I was 19 in 2000 and clueless about almost anything politically meaningful.