A Women’s Fight For VBAC

I read this article while surfing through my Facebook page, which is what I find myself doing a lot because of my battle with Chronic Pain.  I am at home a lot, mostly stuck in bed on a heating pad after 10 years of trying to get a proper diagnosis and proper treatment and battling with doctors and discrimination and mistreatment.

The subject of this story is not related to Chronic Pain but I find the struggle the same: doctors do not always have YOUR best interest at heart.

I also related to the story of Gina Crosley-Corcoran and the birth of her son Jules because I am a new mother with a 3 month old baby and I made a decision to let my doctor induce labor for the ridiculous reasoning that the baby was getting too big.

The idea is the same.  Knowledge is power when it comes to your own medical care, whether that be the desire to experience a vaginal birth after having a C-Section or advocating for the best care for chronic pain in spite of being a recovering addict.

Here is the story of Gina and her husband John and what they had to go through to fight for the most natural thing a woman’s body can do on its own if you allow it to happen.

Jules Micheal Birth Story on The Feminist Breeder

The following is a video narrated by John (the husband) about his side of the story.

Related Articles:

Fighting For A VBAC 

Julie Deardorff at the Chicago Tribune

Women Struggle to Avoid Serial C-Sections

Chelsea R. Robbins and Allison Stevens of Medill News Service

 

High-Resolution Image Of Earth From Electro-L Satellite

Model of Russian Meteorological satellite Elec...

Model of Russian Meteorological satellite Electro-L at CeBIT 2011 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The site offers a zoomable and rotatable photo of the planet Earth taken by a Russian weather satellite called Electro-L.  The photo and video are made up of the highest resolution images ever taken of Earth.

The satellite is in orbit 36, 000 km above Earth’s equator.  It snaps a picture every 30 minutes at resolutions up to 121 megapixels.  60 miles of the Earth’s surface is packed into every pixel.

What is different about this interactive photo is that NASA usually makes an image from an amalgam of several photos.  These images taken by Electro-L show different things than NASA photos have  been able to show.  The images are a combination of visible and near-infrared wavelengths, depicting the Earth in a way not visible to the human eye.  For example, the orange in the picture shows vegetation.

Earth Photo: High-Resolution Image of Earth From Electro-L Satellite on Huffington Post.

Below are some videos:

Northern Hemisphere

Southern Hemisphere