Town Hall | CAMM Worldwide

Town Hall | CAMM Worldwide.

On November 17 at 12pm ET, join host former Vice President Al Gore, inventor Dean Kamen, astronaut Sally Ride and young people from around the world for an interactive discussion exploring youth attitudes toward math and science education.

In order to participate, bookmark the above link and return on November 17th at 12 PM ET.  You can sign in using a Vokle, Facebook, or Twitter account.  You can submit questions and chat with other viewers.

There are so many countries that are ahead of us in math, science, technology, and engineering.  The U.S. is ranked 35th in Math and 29th in Science.

80% of all jobs created in the future will require math and science.  Here is a link to a video with children from other countries vs. children from the U.S. talking about what they do in school or during their day!!

Pledge to connect the young people in your life to after-school opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math.

Panelists:

Former Vice-President Al Gore

Dean Kamen – founder of DEKA Research and Development Corporation and FIRST, which is an organization dedicated to motivationg the next generation to understand and use science and technology.

Sally Ride – American physicist and former NASA astronaut.

Topics:

1. Why is it that other countries celebrate math and science while we often portray them as uncool?

2. Do you think math and science skills are important to your child’s future?  Would your child agree?

3. How can we change attitudes about science and math so that kids today are inspired to take on these subjects?

From the CAMM website- ABOUT CAMM

“To better understand how attitudes and beliefs among young Americans contribute to our poor rankings, we traveled to three countries that rank significantly higher in math and science literacy – Finland, China and Australia – and interviewed young people, parents and teachers about science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and related issues. We compared what we heard from these nations to responses from interviews conducted here in the U.S.”

Here is what they heard:

  • Youth from outside the U.S. take it as a given that if they want to be successful in life, they have to do well in math and science. We did not hear this from the U.S kids.
  • Youth from outside the U.S. are more aware that they will compete in a global marketplace and not just against kids in their own country
  • Outside the U.S., there is much less of a social stigma attached to being smart and doing well in school. In fact, the smart kids are considered cool.

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